Knee Exercises

 

The exercises in the videos below have been provided to help with either your anterior knee pain or your knee osteoarthritis. If there is any doubt about your fitness to do these exercises then please discuss this with your GP. You may find that these exercises may slightly increase your symptoms over the next 12 weeks but be re-assured that persevering should benefit you in the long term. If the exercises do cause some discomfort then take any painkillers that have been prescribed by your GP or pharmacist and continue to exercise.

If these exercises cause a large increase in your pain or after 12 weeks there are no noticeable changes in your day to day symptoms then please contact your GP or NHS Inform for more advice.

 

Exercise 1: Quadriceps Stretch

The quadriceps stretch aims to improve the flexibility of the muscles at the front of your thigh which attach from the hip to the knee. Hold the stretch for a slow 30 second count and repeat five times.

 

Quadriceps stretch from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

 

Exercise 2: Hamstring Wall Stretch

The hamstring stretch aims to improve the flexibility of the muscles at the back of your thigh which run roughly from your bottom to just below your knee. Hold the stretch for a slow 30 second count and repeat five times. 

 

Hamstring wall stretch from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

Exercise 3: Gastrocnuemius/Soleus Stretch

This exercise focuses on stretching the muscles of the lower leg commonly known as the ‘calf’ muscles (the gastrocnemius and soleus). Hold each stretch for a slow 30 second count and repeat five times.      

                                           

The gastrocnemius-soleus from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

 

Exercise 4: Adductor Stretch

The adductor stretch aims to stretch a group of muscles along the inner thigh, commonly called the groin muscles. Hold the stretch for a slow 30 second count and repeat five times

 

Adductor stretch from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

Exercise 5 : Wall Squats

The wall squat is a strengthening exercise for several muscles in the lower body that need to be strong to assist with your symptoms. This exercise works the gluteus maximus (or bottom muscles), the hamstrings (the muscles of the back of your thigh), the quadriceps (the muscles down the front of your thigh) and the core muscles (the muscles of your abdomen). Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter.

 

Wall squats from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

Exercise 6 : Forward step-up

The forward step-up is a strengthening exercise which targets the quadriceps (the muscles down the front of your thigh), the gluteus maximus (bottom muscles or glutes), the hamstrings (the muscles of the back of your thigh) and the core muscles (the muscles of your abdomen). Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter

 

Forward step up from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

Exercise 7 : Heel Drop

The heel drop exercise is used to improve the strength of the gluteus maximus (bottom muscles or glutes), the quadriceps (the muscles down the front of your thigh), and the hamstrings (the muscles of the back of your thigh) and to improve your lower body control and balance. Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter.

 

Heel drop from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

 

Exercise 8 : Mini Squat

If you do not feel confident with the heel drop exercise (exercise 6) then an alternative exercise that can be done without a step is the mini squat. This focuses on the strengthening the gluteus maximus (bottom muscles or glutes), the hamstrings (the muscles of the back of your thigh), the quadriceps (the muscles down the front of your thigh) and the core muscles (the muscles of your abdomen). Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter.

 

 

Mini squat from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

Exercise 9 : Pelvic Drops

The pelvic drop exercise is used to strengthen the gluteus medius muscle (the muscle at the side of your bottom). Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter.

 

Pelvic drops from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

 

 

 Exercise 10 : Bridging

This exercise is a very effective way of strengthening multiple muscle groups of the lower back and legs. Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter.

 

Bridging from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

 

Exercise 11 : Sit-to-stand

The sit-to-stand strengthening exercise primarily targets the gluteus maximus (bottom muscles or glutes), the hamstrings (the muscles of the back of your thigh), the quadriceps (the muscles down the front of your thigh) and your back muscles. Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter.

 

Sit to stand from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.

 

Exercise 12 : Alternating Lunges

Lunges are lower body strengthening exercises that work several muscle groups at once. The targeted muscles groups include the gluteus maximus (bottom muscles or glutes), the hamstrings (the muscles of the back of your thigh), the quadriceps (the muscles down the front of your thigh) and your back muscles. Start at one set of 15 repetitions daily and slowly increase this to three sets of 15 repetitions as you become stronger and fitter

 

Alternating lunges from NHS Ayrshire & Arran on Vimeo.